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The RGI Blog

Top 5 Blog Posts You Should Read as an Association Volunteer

As an association volunteer, your time is limited. We’ve compiled five blogs you should read to help you more efficiently and effectively fill your role.

1. Four Things Association Board Members Can Do Today To Grow Membership

Growing membership is everyone’s job, but too often it can become pigeonholed as a responsibility reserved for the membership department. As an association Board member, you can also be a secret weapon in growing membership. This blog explains four simple steps that you can take today to grow your association’s membership.

2. Five Questions to Ask as an Overcommitted Volunteer

We all enter into our volunteer commitments with the best of intentions. Perhaps something changed at home or work and the demands on your time changed. Maybe you were not clear on the time involved. Whatever the situation, it is important to address it quickly to ensure your commitment is fulfilled and your sanity stays intact. This post gives you five questions to ask when you find yourself overcommitted.

3. Simple Ways Board Members Can Contribute to Conference Success

For many associations, the annual conference is THE networking and education event of the year. As an association board member, you already believe in the organization and the value of the conference, but how can you directly contribute to the success of the conference? This post features things you can do before, during, and after the conference to make it the best it can be.

4. I’m a Committee Chair.. Now What? 3 Tips for Success

Are you a new committee chair? This is the post for you! You have a great opportunity to make a meaningful contribution… if you can figure out where to start. Serving as a volunteer committee chair is both an honor and a huge undertaking. Use these three tips to ensure success.

5. Free E-Book — Board Training Checklist: Going Beyond the Orientation

The start of a new governance term can be an exciting time. Your board gains fresh ideas and perspectives. New board members start with energy and enthusiasm. Returning board members have renewed optimism. Capture that dynamic to propel your board into a productive year by starting with effective, ongoing, board training.